July 23, 2014
theletteraesc:

mrkinch:

zipping:

British Library

I walked completely around the King’s Library Tower, not easy through the cafe traffic, marveling at the display. It is good to be in the presence of books.

I miss it so muuuuuch

theletteraesc:

mrkinch:

zipping:

British Library

I walked completely around the King’s Library Tower, not easy through the cafe traffic, marveling at the display. It is good to be in the presence of books.

I miss it so muuuuuch

July 23, 2014
mrkinch:

bluepueblo:

Ancient Castle Door, Switzerland
photo via patricia

one could forget amazing things passing through a doorway like that

mrkinch:

bluepueblo:

Ancient Castle Door, Switzerland

photo via patricia

one could forget amazing things passing through a doorway like that

July 22, 2014
elementarysweetie:

I do love this photo :-D

elementarysweetie:

I do love this photo :-D

(via basaltgrrl)

July 22, 2014

larygo:

more  DETAILS (x)

(via helens78)

July 22, 2014
theletteraesc:

textsfromxavieracademy:

suggested by darkjedioftheknight

That really is a “cranberry vodka and biscotti” face.

theletteraesc:

textsfromxavieracademy:

suggested by darkjedioftheknight

That really is a “cranberry vodka and biscotti” face.

2:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZVH-Au1MBE3Vw
  
Filed under: hilarity oh erik 
July 22, 2014

awfullythick said: 7, 10, 12!

7.  Have you ever been part of a critique group?  

Not as such, though I have a wonderful group of betas.  <3

10.  What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?

Plot, every time.  Plot is hard.  *shakes fist at noir AU*

12.  Who is your favourite author?

This question is much too hard.  Jane Austen.

1:49pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZVH-Au1MB9teP
  
Filed under: awfullythick meme writing 
July 22, 2014
awfullythick:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Someone needs to write this for the current fan_flashworks challenge, which is “Doorway”
Come on, fandom! You can do it!

ON IT LIKE A CAR BONNET 
I may be going to attempt this.

awfullythick:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Someone needs to write this for the current fan_flashworks challenge, which is “Doorway”

Come on, fandom! You can do it!

ON IT LIKE A CAR BONNET 

I may be going to attempt this.

July 22, 2014
Reblog if you made a good friend on tumblr.

(via idlesuperstar)

July 22, 2014
✍ Finally, an ask-meme for writers! ✍
01: When did you first start writing?
02: What was your favorite book growing up?
03: Are you an avid reader?
04: Have you ever thrown a book across the room?
05: Did you take writing courses in school/college?
06: Have you read any writing-advice books?
07: Have you ever been part of a critique group?
08: What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
09: What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
10: What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?
11: What’s your favorite book cover?
12: Who is your favorite author?
13: What’s your favorite writing quote?
14: What’s your favorite writing blog? c;
15: What would you say has inspired you the most?
16: How do you feel about movies based on books?
17: Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none?
18: How do you feel about love triangles?
19: Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand?
20: What’s your favorite writing program?
21: Do you outline?
22: Do you start with characters or plot?
23: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters?
24: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting?
25: What advice would you give to young writers?
26: Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both?
27: Which is your favorite genre to write?
28: Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end?
29: Which do you find easiest: writing or editing?
30: Have you ever written fan-fiction?
31: Have you ever been published?
32: How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work?
33: Are you interested in having your work published?
34: Describe your writing space.
35: What’s your favorite time of day for writing?
36: Do you listen to music when you write?
37: What’s your oldest WIP?
38: What’s your current WIP?
39: What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had?
40: Which is your favorite original character, and why?
41: What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline?
42: Do you enjoy making your characters suffer?
43: Have you ever killed a main character?
44: What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with?
45: What’s your favorite character name?
46: Describe your perfect writing space.
47: If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why?
48: If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about?
49: If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about?
50: If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be?
This could be fun.
July 22, 2014

owwwwww.

(Source: nightcrxwler, via rozf)

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